Monday, June 24, 2024

Artificial Intelligence news

Synthesia’s hyperrealistic deepfakes will...

Startup Synthesia’s AI-generated avatars are getting an update to make them even...

How underwater drones could...

A potential future conflict between Taiwan and China would be shaped by...

How generative AI could...

First, a confession. I only got into playing video games a little...

I tested out a...

This story first appeared in China Report, MIT Technology Review’s newsletter about...
HomeTechnologyFCC hits Dish...

FCC hits Dish Network with $150K fine in first-ever space debris penalty


Dish Network has been slapped with a historic $150,000 fine by the Federal Communications Commission for failing to properly deorbit one of its broadcast satellites, creating orbital debris.

The FCC penalized the popular broadcast satellite provider for improperly disposing of its EchoStar-7 satellite in the agency’s first-ever space-debris enforcement measure.

“As satellite operations become more prevalent and the space economy accelerates, we must be certain that operators comply with their commitments,” FCC Enforcement Bureau Chief Loyaan A. Egal said in a statement.

“This is a breakthrough settlement, making very clear the FCC has strong enforcement authority and capability to enforce its vitally important space debris rules,” he added.

The satellite was launched into space by DISH in 2002, according to the FCC.


The FCC handed out its first-ever space junk fine to Dish Network this week.
ESA / Barcroft Media

The company filed an orbital mitigation plan that was approved by the agency in 2012, in which Dish agreed to bring the satellite, at the end of its mission, to an altitude of 186 miles above its operational geostationary arc.

DISH projected the satellite would begin de-orbiting in May 2022, however, in February 2022, it learned it had little propellant left, meaning it would not be able to follow its original plan.

“DISH ultimately retired the satellite at a disposal orbit approximately 72 miles above the geostationary arc, well short of the disposal orbit of (186 miles) specified in its orbital debris mitigation plan,” the FCC said.


SPACE - UNDATED: This ESA image shows trackable objects in orbit around Earth. The number of objects in Earth orbit has increased steadily - by two hundred per year on average. Today, the number of catalogued objects is approx. 12,500. Note: The debris objects shown in the images are an artist's impression based on actual density data. However, the debris objects are shown at an eggagerated size to make them visible at the scale shown.  The amount of space junk orbiting earth has reached a 'tipping point' where continual collisions are thickening the already dense cloud shrouding the Earth, a Nasa report has revealed. In practical terms, it means that the amount of junk floating around the planet will make it increasingly difficult for spacecraft to leave the planet, effectively trapping us on earth. It also poses 'potentially catastrophic risk' to astronauts, satellites and the International Space Station. 'We've lost control of the environment,' said retired Nasa senior scientist Donald Kessler, who authored the report. There are 22,000 objects in orbit that are big enough for officials on the ground to track and countless more smaller ones that could do damage to human-carrying spaceships and valuable satellites. It is estimated that there are as may as 370,000 pieces of space junk floating in Earth's orbit, traveling at speeds of up to 22,000 mph.  PHOTOGRAPH BY ESA / Barcroft Media  UK Office, London. T +44 845 370 2233 W www.barcroftmedia.com  USA Office, New York City. T +1 212 564 8159 W www.barcroftusa.com  Indian Office, Delhi. T +91 11 4101 1726 W www.barcroftindia.com  Australasian & Pacific Rim Office, Melbourne. E info@barcroftpacific.com T +613 9510 3188 or +613 9510 0688 W www.barcroftpacific.com
At the lower altitude, the defunct satellite poses a potential threat to other orbiting objects.
ESA / Barcroft Media

At the lower altitude, the defunct satellite poses a potential threat to other orbiting objects.

The FCC licenses radio frequencies used by satellites and is in charge of enforcing satellite operators to properly handle their satellite debris, according to Gizmodo.

The agency established a Space Bureau in order to regulate the ballooning satellite industry and space clutter it causes earlier this year. 

There are currently 34,580 hunks of space junk being tracked by Space Surveillance Networks, with thousands of other smaller pieces of debris also hazardously floating about, according to the European Space Agency.



Article Source link and Credit

Continue reading

Bugatti unveils new sports car with 1,800 horsepower and a $4M price tag

High-performance automaker Bugatti has unveiled its next-generation hyper sports car, the Tourbillon, its successor to the Chiron. The French luxury car manufacturer said it named the new model after a watchmaking invention made by a Swiss-born “genius” living in France in 1801, describing...

Meta, Apple reportedly discuss partnership to add AI to iPhones

Facebook parent Meta Platforms has discussed integrating its generative AI model into Apple’s recently announced AI system for iPhones, the Wall Street Journal reported on Sunday. The move comes as Apple plans to add technology from other AI companies on its devices amid reports that it was...

X CEO Linda Yaccarino shakes up inner circle amid pressure from Elon Musk to boost sales, cut costs: report

Linda Yaccarino, the chief executive of social media platform X, has shaken up her inner circle in the face of pressure from owner Elon Musk to boost sales and cut costs, the Financial Times said on Sunday. This month Yaccarino fired her...